Saturday, 20 June 2020

Intersectional theology, an Introductory Guide by Grace Ji-Sun Kim and Susan M. Shaw.

Permit me to present to you the Intersectional theology, an Introductory Guide by Grace Ji-Sun Kim and Susan M. Shaw. The book was published in 2018 by Fortress Press. I w𝚒𝚕𝚕 𝚜𝚝𝚊𝚛𝚝 𝚋𝚢 𝚜𝚊𝚢𝚒𝚗𝚐 𝚝𝚑𝚊𝚝 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚋𝚘𝚘𝚔 𝚒𝚜 𝚊 𝚙𝚎𝚛𝚏𝚎𝚌𝚝 𝚖𝚊𝚗𝚞𝚊𝚕 𝚘𝚏 𝚌𝚘𝚗𝚝𝚎𝚡𝚝𝚞𝚊𝚕 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚘𝚕𝚘𝚐𝚢.
𝙲𝚘𝚗𝚝𝚎𝚡𝚝𝚞𝚊𝚕 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚘𝚕𝚘𝚐𝚢 𝚌𝚘𝚞𝚕𝚍 𝚋𝚎 𝚜𝚎𝚎𝚗 𝚊𝚜 𝚊 𝚠𝚊𝚢 𝚒𝚗 𝚠𝚑𝚒𝚌𝚑 𝚊 𝙲𝚑𝚞𝚛𝚌𝚑 𝚊𝚛𝚝𝚒𝚌𝚞𝚕𝚊𝚝𝚎𝚜 𝚒𝚝𝚜 𝚔𝚗𝚘𝚠𝚕𝚎𝚍𝚐𝚎 𝚘𝚏 𝙶𝚘𝚍 𝚒𝚗 𝚛𝚎𝚜𝚙𝚘𝚗𝚜𝚎 𝚝𝚘 𝚒𝚝𝚜 𝚛𝚎𝚊𝚕𝚒𝚝𝚒𝚎𝚜. 𝚃𝚑𝚎 𝚛𝚎𝚜𝚙𝚘𝚗𝚜𝚎 𝚒𝚗 𝚚𝚞𝚎𝚜𝚝𝚒𝚘𝚗 𝚌𝚘𝚞𝚕𝚍 𝚋𝚎 𝚒𝚗 𝚛𝚎𝚕𝚊𝚝𝚒𝚘𝚗𝚜𝚑𝚒𝚙 𝚝𝚒𝚖𝚎 (𝚝𝚎𝚖𝚙𝚘𝚛𝚊𝚕 𝚌𝚘𝚗𝚝𝚎𝚡𝚝), 𝚠𝚒𝚝𝚑 𝚒𝚝𝚜 𝚌𝚞𝚕𝚝𝚞𝚛𝚊𝚕 (𝚌𝚞𝚕𝚝𝚞𝚛𝚊𝚕 𝚌𝚘𝚗𝚝𝚎𝚡𝚝), 𝚐𝚎𝚘𝚐𝚛𝚊𝚙𝚑𝚒𝚌𝚊𝚕 𝚜𝚒𝚝𝚞𝚊𝚝𝚒𝚘𝚗 (𝚐𝚎𝚘𝚐𝚛𝚊𝚙𝚑𝚒𝚌𝚊𝚕 𝚌𝚘𝚗𝚝𝚎𝚡𝚝), 𝚜𝚘𝚌𝚒𝚎𝚝𝚊𝚕 𝚙𝚛𝚘𝚋𝚕𝚎𝚖𝚜 𝚕𝚒𝚔𝚎 𝚛𝚊𝚌𝚒𝚜𝚖, 𝚜𝚎𝚐𝚛𝚎𝚐𝚊𝚝𝚒𝚘𝚗, 𝚠𝚘𝚖𝚎𝚗 𝚜𝚝𝚊𝚝𝚞𝚜, 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚜𝚒𝚝𝚞𝚊𝚝𝚒𝚘𝚗 𝚘𝚏 𝚒𝚖𝚖𝚒𝚐𝚛𝚊𝚗𝚝𝚜, 𝚙𝚘𝚟𝚎𝚛𝚝𝚢, 𝚛𝚊𝚌𝚎, 𝚌𝚕𝚊𝚜𝚜, 𝚎𝚝𝚌. (𝚜𝚘𝚌𝚒𝚊𝚕 𝚌𝚘𝚗𝚝𝚎𝚡𝚝), 𝚎𝚝𝚌. 𝙱𝚞𝚝 𝚘𝚗𝚎 𝚘𝚏 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚙𝚛𝚘𝚋𝚕𝚎𝚖𝚜 𝚠𝚎 𝚏𝚊𝚌𝚎 𝚒𝚗 𝚍𝚎𝚏𝚒𝚗𝚒𝚗𝚐 𝚌𝚘𝚗𝚝𝚎𝚡𝚝𝚞𝚊𝚕 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚘𝚕𝚘𝚐𝚢 𝚒𝚜 𝚝𝚑𝚊𝚝, 𝚏𝚘𝚛 𝚌𝚎𝚗𝚝𝚞𝚛𝚒𝚎𝚜, 𝚠𝚎 𝚑𝚊𝚟𝚎 𝚋𝚎𝚎𝚗 𝚖𝚊𝚍𝚎 𝚝𝚘 𝚞𝚗𝚍𝚎𝚛𝚜𝚝𝚊𝚗𝚍 𝚝𝚑𝚊𝚝 𝚌𝚎𝚛𝚝𝚊𝚒𝚗 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚘𝚛𝚒𝚎𝚜 𝚘𝚗 𝙶𝚘𝚍 𝚑𝚊𝚟𝚎 𝚊𝚕𝚠𝚊𝚢𝚜 𝚋𝚎𝚎𝚗 𝚞𝚗𝚒𝚟𝚎𝚛𝚜𝚊𝚕 𝚏𝚊𝚌𝚝𝚜. 𝚃𝚘𝚍𝚊𝚢, 𝚎𝚟𝚎𝚛𝚢𝚋𝚘𝚍𝚢 𝚒𝚜 𝚋𝚛𝚊𝚗𝚍𝚒𝚜𝚑𝚒𝚗𝚐 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚠𝚘𝚛𝚔𝚜 𝚘𝚏 𝙰𝚚𝚞𝚒𝚗𝚊𝚜 𝚊𝚗𝚍 𝙰𝚞𝚐𝚞𝚜𝚝𝚒𝚗 𝚊𝚜 𝚒𝚏 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚒𝚛 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚘𝚕𝚘𝚐𝚒𝚎𝚜 𝚠𝚎𝚛𝚎 𝚖𝚊𝚍𝚎 𝚒𝚗 𝚑𝚎𝚊𝚟𝚎𝚗. 𝙰𝚗𝚍 𝚠𝚑𝚎𝚗 𝚢𝚘𝚞 𝚖𝚎𝚗𝚝𝚒𝚘𝚗 𝚗𝚊𝚖𝚎𝚜 𝚏𝚛𝚘𝚖 𝚘𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚛 𝚌𝚕𝚒𝚖𝚎𝚜 𝚙𝚎𝚘𝚙𝚕𝚎 𝚠𝚒𝚕𝚕 𝚝𝚎𝚕𝚕 𝚢𝚘𝚞 𝚝𝚑𝚊𝚝 𝚝𝚑𝚘𝚜𝚎 𝚍𝚘 𝚗𝚘𝚝 𝚊𝚙𝚙𝚕𝚢 𝚝𝚘 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚞𝚗𝚒𝚟𝚎𝚛𝚜𝚊𝚕 𝚌𝚑𝚞𝚛𝚌𝚑. 𝙰𝚗𝚍 𝚋𝚎𝚌𝚊𝚞𝚜𝚎 𝚝𝚑𝚒𝚜 𝚒𝚜 𝚗𝚘𝚝 𝚠𝚑𝚊𝚝 𝙸’𝚖 𝚑𝚎𝚛𝚎 𝚝𝚘 𝚊𝚍𝚍𝚛𝚎𝚜𝚜, 𝚕𝚎𝚝 𝚖𝚎 𝚓𝚞𝚜𝚝 𝚜𝚝𝚊𝚝𝚎 𝚝𝚑𝚊𝚝 𝚎𝚟𝚎𝚛𝚢 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚘𝚕𝚘𝚐𝚢 𝚒𝚜 𝚊 𝚌𝚘𝚗𝚝𝚎𝚡𝚝𝚞𝚊𝚕 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚘𝚕𝚘𝚐𝚢 𝚊𝚗𝚍 𝚛𝚎𝚜𝚙𝚘𝚗𝚍𝚎𝚍 𝚊𝚝 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚋𝚎𝚐𝚒𝚗𝚗𝚒𝚗𝚐 𝚘𝚏 𝚒𝚝𝚜 𝚏𝚘𝚛𝚖𝚞𝚕𝚊𝚝𝚒𝚘𝚗 𝚝𝚘 𝚕𝚘𝚌𝚊𝚕 𝚙𝚛𝚘𝚋𝚕𝚎𝚖𝚜. 𝚂𝚝𝚊𝚛𝚝𝚒𝚗𝚐 𝚏𝚛𝚘𝚖 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝙾𝚕𝚍 𝚃𝚎𝚜𝚝𝚊𝚖𝚎𝚗𝚝 𝚝𝚘 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚠𝚛𝚒𝚝𝚒𝚗𝚐 𝚘𝚏 𝙰𝚚𝚞𝚒𝚗𝚊𝚜, 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚠𝚛𝚒𝚝𝚎𝚛 𝚠𝚊𝚜 𝚓𝚞𝚜𝚝 𝚝𝚛𝚢𝚒𝚗𝚐 𝚝𝚘 𝚙𝚞𝚝 𝚒𝚗 𝚠𝚘𝚛𝚍𝚜 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝙶𝚘𝚍-𝚎𝚡𝚙𝚎𝚛𝚒𝚎𝚗𝚌𝚎 𝚘𝚏 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚒𝚛 𝚙𝚎𝚘𝚙𝚕𝚎 𝚒𝚗 𝚊 𝚐𝚒𝚟𝚎𝚗 𝚝𝚒𝚖𝚎 𝚘𝚏 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚒𝚛 𝚑𝚒𝚜𝚝𝚘𝚛𝚢. 𝚃𝚑𝚒𝚜 𝚍𝚘𝚎𝚜 𝚗𝚘𝚝, 𝚑𝚘𝚠𝚎𝚟𝚎𝚛, 𝚖𝚊𝚔𝚎 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚖 𝚕𝚎𝚜𝚜 𝚒𝚖𝚙𝚘𝚛𝚝𝚊𝚗𝚝. 𝙾𝚗 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚌𝚘𝚗𝚝𝚛𝚊𝚛𝚢, 𝚒𝚝 𝚙𝚛𝚘𝚟𝚎𝚜 𝚝𝚑𝚊𝚝 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚢 𝚠𝚎𝚛𝚎 𝚝𝚎𝚜𝚝𝚎𝚍 𝚊𝚗𝚍 𝚏𝚘𝚞𝚗𝚍 𝚟𝚊𝚕𝚒𝚍. 𝙱𝚞𝚝 𝚜𝚘, 𝚊𝚕𝚜𝚘 𝚊𝚛𝚎 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚘𝚛𝚒𝚎𝚜 𝚝𝚑𝚊𝚝 𝚠𝚎𝚛𝚎 𝚍𝚎𝚟𝚎𝚕𝚘𝚙𝚎𝚍 𝚒𝚗 𝚝𝚑𝚒𝚜 𝚋𝚘𝚘𝚔. 𝚃𝚑𝚎𝚢 𝚊𝚛𝚎 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚚𝚞𝚎𝚜𝚝 𝚘𝚏 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚌𝚑𝚞𝚛𝚌𝚑𝚎𝚜 𝚘𝚏 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚊𝚞𝚝𝚑𝚘𝚛𝚜 𝚝𝚘 𝚛𝚎𝚜𝚙𝚘𝚗𝚍 𝚝𝚘 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚜𝚘𝚌𝚒𝚊𝚕, 𝚝𝚎𝚖𝚙𝚘𝚛𝚊𝚕, 𝚐𝚎𝚘𝚐𝚛𝚊𝚙𝚑𝚒𝚌𝚊𝚕, 𝚎𝚝𝚌., 𝚙𝚛𝚘𝚋𝚕𝚎𝚖𝚜 𝚘𝚏 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚒𝚛 𝚌𝚘𝚖𝚖𝚞𝚗𝚒𝚝𝚒𝚎𝚜. 𝚃𝚑𝚎 𝚋𝚘𝚘𝚔 𝚒𝚜 𝚍𝚎𝚟𝚎𝚕𝚘𝚙𝚎𝚍 𝚞𝚗𝚍𝚎𝚛 𝚏𝚒𝚟𝚎 𝚖𝚊𝚓𝚘𝚛 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚖𝚎𝚜. 𝙸𝚗 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚏𝚒𝚛𝚜𝚝 𝚌𝚑𝚊𝚙𝚝𝚎𝚛, 𝙸𝚗𝚝𝚛𝚘𝚍𝚞𝚌𝚝𝚒𝚘𝚗 𝚝𝚘 𝙸𝚗𝚝𝚎𝚛𝚜𝚎𝚌𝚝𝚒𝚘𝚗𝚊𝚕𝚒𝚝𝚢 (𝚙𝚙. 𝟷–𝟷𝟾), 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚊𝚞𝚝𝚑𝚘𝚛𝚜 𝚛𝚎𝚝𝚛𝚊𝚌𝚎𝚍 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚘𝚛𝚒𝚐𝚒𝚗, 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚌𝚘𝚗𝚝𝚎𝚡𝚝 𝚊𝚗𝚍 𝚎𝚟𝚘𝚕𝚞𝚝𝚒𝚘𝚗 𝚘𝚏 𝚒𝚗𝚝𝚎𝚛𝚜𝚎𝚌𝚝𝚒𝚘𝚗𝚊𝚕𝚒𝚝𝚢. 𝚃𝚑𝚎𝚢 𝚎𝚡𝚙𝚕𝚊𝚒𝚗𝚎𝚍 𝚝𝚑𝚊𝚝 𝚒𝚗 𝚊 𝚖𝚞𝚕𝚝𝚒𝚌𝚞𝚕𝚝𝚞𝚛𝚊𝚕 𝚜𝚘𝚌𝚒𝚎𝚝𝚢 𝚕𝚒𝚔𝚎 𝚝𝚑𝚊𝚝 𝚘𝚏 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚄𝚗𝚒𝚝𝚎𝚍 𝚂𝚝𝚊𝚝𝚎𝚜 𝚘𝚏 𝙰𝚖𝚎𝚛𝚒𝚌𝚊, 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚍𝚘𝚖𝚒𝚗𝚊𝚗𝚝 𝚐𝚛𝚘𝚞𝚙 𝚊𝚕𝚠𝚊𝚢𝚜 𝚕𝚘𝚛𝚍 𝚒𝚝 𝚘𝚟𝚎𝚛 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚛𝚎𝚜𝚝 𝚘𝚏 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚖𝚎𝚖𝚋𝚎𝚛𝚜. 𝙰𝚗𝚍 𝚒𝚗 𝚜𝚞𝚌𝚑 𝚜𝚘𝚌𝚒𝚎𝚝𝚒𝚎𝚜 𝚠𝚑𝚎𝚛𝚎 𝚖𝚎𝚗 𝚖𝚊𝚔𝚎 𝚕𝚊𝚠𝚜, 𝚠𝚘𝚖𝚎𝚗, 𝚖𝚊𝚒𝚗𝚕𝚢 𝚘𝚏 𝚌𝚘𝚕𝚘𝚞𝚛, 𝚕𝚒𝚔𝚎 𝚒𝚗 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚎𝚡𝚊𝚖𝚙𝚕𝚎 𝚊𝚋𝚘𝚟𝚎, 𝚊𝚛𝚎 𝚍𝚘𝚞𝚋𝚕𝚢 𝚖𝚊𝚛𝚐𝚒𝚗𝚊𝚕𝚒𝚣𝚎𝚍. 𝙰𝚌𝚌𝚘𝚛𝚍𝚒𝚗𝚐 𝚝𝚘 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚊𝚞𝚝𝚑𝚘𝚛𝚜, 𝚝𝚑𝚘𝚜𝚎 𝚜𝚝𝚛𝚞𝚌𝚝𝚞𝚛𝚎𝚜 𝚊𝚛𝚎 𝚊𝚕𝚜𝚘 𝚒𝚗𝚏𝚕𝚞𝚎𝚗𝚌𝚒𝚗𝚐 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚠𝚊𝚢 𝚠𝚘𝚖𝚎𝚗, 𝚛𝚊𝚌𝚒𝚊𝚕𝚒𝚣𝚎𝚍 𝚙𝚎𝚘𝚙𝚕𝚎, 𝚙𝚎𝚘𝚙𝚕𝚎 𝚠𝚒𝚝𝚑 𝚍𝚒𝚏𝚏𝚎𝚛𝚎𝚗𝚝 𝚜𝚎𝚡𝚞𝚊𝚕 𝚘𝚛𝚒𝚎𝚗𝚝𝚊𝚝𝚒𝚘𝚗𝚜, 𝚎𝚝𝚌., 𝚊𝚛𝚎 𝚌𝚘𝚗𝚜𝚒𝚍𝚎𝚛𝚎𝚍 𝚒𝚗 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚌𝚘𝚗𝚝𝚎𝚡𝚝 𝚘𝚏 𝚊 𝚌𝚑𝚞𝚛𝚌𝚑 𝚝𝚑𝚊𝚝 𝚋𝚊𝚜𝚎𝚜 𝚒𝚝𝚜 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚘𝚕𝚘𝚐𝚢 𝚘𝚗 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚠𝚑𝚒𝚝𝚎, 𝚖𝚎𝚗, 𝚛𝚒𝚌𝚑, 𝚑𝚎𝚝𝚎𝚛𝚘𝚜𝚎𝚡𝚞𝚊𝚕, 𝚎𝚝𝚌. 𝚋𝚊𝚌𝚔𝚐𝚛𝚘𝚞𝚗𝚍.
𝙸𝚗 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚜𝚎𝚌𝚘𝚗𝚍 𝚌𝚑𝚊𝚙𝚝𝚎𝚛, 𝙱𝚒𝚘𝚐𝚛𝚊𝚙𝚑𝚢 𝚊𝚜 𝙸𝚗𝚝𝚎𝚛𝚌𝚞𝚕𝚝𝚞𝚛𝚊𝚕 𝚃𝚑𝚎𝚘𝚕𝚘𝚐𝚢 (𝚙𝚙. 𝟷𝟿–𝟺0), 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚢 𝚙𝚕𝚎𝚊𝚍 𝚏𝚘𝚛 𝚊 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚘𝚕𝚘𝚐𝚢 𝚝𝚑𝚊𝚝 𝚝𝚊𝚔𝚎𝚜 𝚒𝚗𝚝𝚘 𝚌𝚘𝚗𝚜𝚒𝚍𝚎𝚛𝚊𝚝𝚒𝚘𝚗, 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚕𝚒𝚟𝚎𝚍 𝚎𝚡𝚙𝚎𝚛𝚒𝚎𝚗𝚌𝚎 𝚘𝚏 𝚎𝚟𝚎𝚛𝚢 𝚒𝚗𝚍𝚒𝚟𝚒𝚍𝚞𝚊𝚕, 𝚐𝚛𝚘𝚞𝚙 𝚊𝚗𝚍 𝚌𝚘𝚖𝚖𝚞𝚗𝚒𝚝𝚢. 𝚃𝚑𝚎𝚢 𝚚𝚞𝚎𝚜𝚝𝚒𝚘𝚗 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚒𝚍𝚎𝚊 𝚘𝚏 𝚛𝚎𝚜𝚝𝚛𝚒𝚌𝚝𝚒𝚗𝚐 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚘𝚕𝚘𝚐𝚢 𝚝𝚘 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚕𝚒𝚟𝚎𝚍 𝚎𝚡𝚙𝚎𝚛𝚒𝚎𝚗𝚌𝚎 𝚘𝚏 𝚜𝚘𝚖𝚎 𝚐𝚒𝚟𝚎𝚗 𝚜𝚘𝚌𝚒𝚎𝚝𝚒𝚎𝚜 𝚠𝚑𝚒𝚕𝚎 𝚍𝚎𝚗𝚢𝚒𝚗𝚐 𝚘𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚛𝚜 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚛𝚒𝚐𝚑𝚝 𝚝𝚘 𝚊𝚛𝚝𝚒𝚌𝚞𝚕𝚊𝚝𝚎 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚒𝚛 𝙶𝚘𝚍-𝚎𝚡𝚙𝚎𝚛𝚒𝚎𝚗𝚌𝚎 𝚒𝚗𝚝𝚘 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚘𝚕𝚘𝚐𝚢. 𝙰𝚗𝚍 𝚎𝚟𝚎𝚗 𝚝𝚑𝚘𝚞𝚐𝚑 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚢 𝚍𝚘 𝚗𝚘𝚝 𝚍𝚒𝚜𝚌𝚊𝚛𝚍 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚎𝚡𝚙𝚎𝚛𝚒𝚎𝚗𝚌𝚎 𝚘𝚏 𝚘𝚞𝚛 𝚙𝚊𝚝𝚛𝚒𝚊𝚛𝚌𝚑𝚜 𝚒𝚗 𝚏𝚊𝚒𝚝𝚑, 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚢 𝚜𝚝𝚒𝚕𝚕 𝚒𝚗𝚜𝚒𝚜𝚝 𝚝𝚑𝚊𝚝 𝚊𝚗𝚢 𝚍𝚒𝚜𝚌𝚘𝚞𝚛𝚜𝚎 𝚘𝚗 𝙶𝚘𝚍 𝚝𝚑𝚊𝚝 𝚍𝚘𝚎𝚜 𝚗𝚘𝚝 𝚝𝚊𝚔𝚎 𝚒𝚗𝚝𝚘 𝚌𝚘𝚗𝚜𝚒𝚍𝚎𝚛𝚊𝚝𝚒𝚘𝚗 𝚍𝚒𝚏𝚏𝚎𝚛𝚎𝚗𝚝 𝚒𝚗𝚍𝚒𝚟𝚒𝚍𝚞𝚊𝚕 𝚎𝚡𝚙𝚎𝚛𝚒𝚎𝚗𝚌𝚎𝚜 𝚋𝚎𝚌𝚘𝚖𝚎𝚜 𝚊 𝚍𝚒𝚜𝚌𝚊𝚛𝚗𝚊𝚝𝚎 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚘𝚕𝚘𝚐𝚢. 𝚃𝚑𝚒𝚜 𝚒𝚜 𝚠𝚑𝚢 “𝚒𝚗𝚝𝚎𝚛𝚜𝚎𝚌𝚝𝚒𝚘𝚗𝚊𝚕 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚘𝚕𝚘𝚐𝚢 𝚖𝚊𝚔𝚎𝚜 𝚛𝚘𝚘𝚖 𝚏𝚘𝚛 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚜𝚙𝚎𝚌𝚒𝚏𝚒𝚌, 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚒𝚍𝚒𝚘𝚜𝚢𝚗𝚌𝚛𝚊𝚝𝚒𝚌, 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚘𝚟𝚎𝚛𝚕𝚘𝚘𝚔𝚎𝚍 𝚊𝚗𝚍 𝚖𝚊𝚛𝚐𝚒𝚗𝚊𝚕𝚒𝚣𝚎𝚍 𝚝𝚑𝚊𝚝 𝚖𝚊𝚢 𝚋𝚎 𝚜𝚙𝚎𝚊𝚔𝚒𝚗𝚐 𝚒𝚗 𝙶𝚘𝚍’𝚜 𝚜𝚝𝚒𝚕𝚕, 𝚜𝚖𝚊𝚕𝚕 𝚟𝚘𝚒𝚌𝚎”. (𝚙. 𝟷𝟾)
𝙸𝚗 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚃𝚑𝚒𝚛𝚍 𝙲𝚑𝚊𝚙𝚝𝚎𝚛, 𝙸𝚗𝚝𝚎𝚛𝚜𝚎𝚌𝚝𝚒𝚘𝚗𝚊𝚕𝚒𝚝𝚢 𝚊𝚜 𝚃𝚑𝚎𝚘𝚕𝚘𝚐𝚒𝚌𝚊𝚕 𝙼𝚎𝚝𝚑𝚘𝚍 (𝚙𝚙. 𝟺𝟷–𝟼𝟺), 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚊𝚞𝚝𝚑𝚘𝚛𝚜 𝚎𝚌𝚑𝚘𝚎𝚍 𝚠𝚑𝚊𝚝 𝙸 𝚜𝚊𝚒𝚍 𝚊𝚝 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚋𝚎𝚐𝚒𝚗𝚗𝚒𝚗𝚐 𝚝𝚑𝚊𝚝 𝚎𝚟𝚎𝚛𝚢 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚘𝚕𝚘𝚐𝚢 𝚒𝚜 𝚊 𝚌𝚘𝚗𝚝𝚎𝚡𝚝𝚞𝚊𝚕 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚘𝚕𝚘𝚐𝚢: “𝚊𝚜 𝚊 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚘𝚕𝚘𝚐𝚒𝚌𝚊𝚕 𝚖𝚎𝚝𝚑𝚘𝚍, 𝚒𝚗𝚝𝚎𝚛𝚜𝚎𝚌𝚝𝚒𝚘𝚗𝚊𝚕𝚒𝚝𝚢 𝚙𝚛𝚎𝚜𝚞𝚖𝚎𝚜 𝚝𝚑𝚊𝚝 𝚎𝚊𝚌𝚑 𝚘𝚏 𝚞𝚜 𝚍𝚘𝚎𝚜 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚘𝚕𝚘𝚐𝚢 𝚏𝚛𝚘𝚖 𝚊 𝚜𝚘𝚌𝚒𝚊𝚕 𝚕𝚘𝚌𝚊𝚝𝚒𝚘𝚗 𝚝𝚑𝚊𝚝 𝚑𝚊𝚜 𝚒𝚗𝚏𝚕𝚞𝚎𝚗𝚌𝚎𝚍 (𝚘𝚏 𝚠𝚑𝚒𝚌𝚑 𝚠𝚎 𝚊𝚛𝚎 𝚜𝚘𝚖𝚎𝚝𝚒𝚖𝚎𝚜 𝚊𝚠𝚊𝚛𝚎 𝚊𝚗𝚍 𝚜𝚘𝚖𝚎𝚝𝚒𝚖𝚎𝚜 𝚗𝚘𝚝) 𝚘𝚗 𝚘𝚞𝚛 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚘𝚕𝚘𝚐𝚒𝚎𝚜”. 𝙰𝚗𝚍 𝚋𝚢 𝚝𝚑𝚒𝚜, 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚢 𝚌𝚊𝚕𝚕 𝚏𝚘𝚛 𝚊 𝚠𝚒𝚍𝚎𝚛 𝚊𝚌𝚌𝚎𝚙𝚝𝚊𝚗𝚌𝚎 𝚘𝚏 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚙𝚕𝚞𝚛𝚊𝚕𝚒𝚝𝚢 𝚘𝚏 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚘𝚕𝚘𝚐𝚒𝚌𝚊𝚕 𝚍𝚒𝚜𝚌𝚘𝚞𝚛𝚜𝚎𝚜 𝚊𝚗𝚍 𝚎𝚗𝚌𝚘𝚞𝚛𝚊𝚐𝚎 𝚊 𝚌𝚑𝚊𝚗𝚐𝚎 𝚘𝚏 𝚍𝚒𝚜𝚌𝚘𝚞𝚛𝚜𝚎 𝚊𝚗𝚍 𝚊𝚗 𝚎𝚗𝚍 𝚝𝚘 𝚎𝚟𝚎𝚛𝚢 𝚘𝚙𝚙𝚛𝚎𝚜𝚜𝚒𝚟𝚎 𝚊𝚗𝚍 𝚌𝚘𝚕𝚘𝚗𝚒𝚊𝚕 𝚍𝚒𝚜𝚌𝚘𝚞𝚛𝚜𝚎 𝚘𝚗 𝙶𝚘𝚍. 𝚃𝚑𝚎𝚒𝚛 𝚝𝚑𝚘𝚞𝚐𝚑𝚝 𝚒𝚗 𝚝𝚑𝚒𝚜 𝚌𝚑𝚊𝚙𝚝𝚎𝚛 𝚒𝚜 𝚊 𝚌𝚑𝚊𝚕𝚕𝚎𝚗𝚐𝚎 𝚝𝚘 𝚊𝚕𝚕 𝚕𝚘𝚌𝚊𝚕 𝙲𝚑𝚞𝚛𝚌𝚑𝚎𝚜 𝚝𝚘 𝚚𝚞𝚎𝚜𝚝𝚒𝚘𝚗 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚒𝚛 𝚖𝚒𝚕𝚒𝚎𝚞 𝚊𝚗𝚍 𝚝𝚘 𝚜𝚎𝚎 𝚑𝚘𝚠 𝙶𝚘𝚍 𝚜𝚙𝚎𝚊𝚔𝚜 (𝚜𝚒𝚕𝚎𝚗𝚝𝚕𝚢) 𝚒𝚗 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚒𝚛 𝚕𝚊𝚗𝚐𝚞𝚊𝚐𝚎𝚜 𝚊𝚗𝚍 𝚑𝚒𝚜𝚝𝚘𝚛𝚒𝚎𝚜.
𝚃𝚑𝚎 𝚏𝚘𝚞𝚛𝚝𝚑 𝚌𝚑𝚊𝚙𝚝𝚎𝚛, 𝙰𝚙𝚙𝚕𝚢𝚒𝚗𝚐 𝙸𝚗𝚝𝚎𝚛𝚜𝚎𝚌𝚝𝚒𝚘𝚗𝚊𝚕𝚒𝚝𝚢 𝚝𝚘 𝚃𝚑𝚎𝚘𝚕𝚘𝚐𝚢 𝚊𝚗𝚍 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝙱𝚒𝚋𝚕𝚎 (𝚙𝚙. 𝟼𝟻–𝟽𝟾) 𝚘𝚙𝚎𝚗𝚜 𝚠𝚒𝚝𝚑 𝚝𝚑𝚒𝚜 𝚚𝚞𝚎𝚜𝚝𝚒𝚘𝚗, “𝚆𝚑𝚊𝚝 𝚑𝚊𝚙𝚙𝚎𝚗𝚜 𝚠𝚑𝚎𝚗 𝚠𝚎 𝚊𝚙𝚙𝚕𝚢 𝚒𝚗𝚝𝚎𝚛𝚜𝚎𝚌𝚝𝚒𝚘𝚗𝚊𝚕𝚒𝚝𝚢 𝚝𝚘 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚘𝚕𝚘𝚐𝚒𝚌𝚊𝚕 𝚚𝚞𝚎𝚜𝚝𝚒𝚘𝚗𝚜 𝚊𝚗𝚍 𝙱𝚒𝚋𝚕𝚒𝚌𝚊𝚕 𝚝𝚎𝚡𝚝𝚜?” 𝙰𝚗𝚍 𝚝𝚑𝚛𝚘𝚞𝚐𝚑𝚘𝚞𝚝 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚌𝚑𝚊𝚙𝚝𝚎𝚛, 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚊𝚞𝚝𝚑𝚘𝚛𝚜 𝚝𝚛𝚒𝚎𝚍 𝚝𝚘 𝚋𝚞𝚝𝚝𝚛𝚎𝚜𝚜 𝚑𝚘𝚠 𝚊𝚙𝚙𝚕𝚢𝚒𝚗𝚐 𝚒𝚗𝚝𝚎𝚛𝚜𝚎𝚌𝚝𝚒𝚘𝚗𝚊𝚕𝚒𝚝𝚢 𝚒𝚗 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚘𝚕𝚘𝚐𝚢 𝚊𝚗𝚍 𝙱𝚒𝚋𝚕𝚒𝚌𝚊𝚕 𝚜𝚝𝚞𝚍𝚒𝚎𝚜 𝚎𝚗𝚛𝚒𝚌𝚑𝚎𝚜 𝚘𝚞𝚛 𝚔𝚗𝚘𝚠𝚕𝚎𝚍𝚐𝚎 𝚘𝚏 𝙶𝚘𝚍 𝚊𝚗𝚍 𝚙𝚞𝚝𝚜 𝚊𝚗 𝚎𝚗𝚍 𝚝𝚘 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚑𝚎𝚐𝚎𝚖𝚘𝚗𝚒𝚌 𝚒𝚗𝚝𝚎𝚛𝚙𝚛𝚎𝚝𝚊𝚝𝚒𝚘𝚗 𝚘𝚏 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚛𝚎𝚟𝚎𝚕𝚊𝚝𝚒𝚘𝚗.
𝚃𝚑𝚎𝚢 𝚊𝚕𝚜𝚘 𝚎𝚡𝚙𝚕𝚊𝚒𝚗 𝚑𝚘𝚠 𝙸𝚗𝚝𝚎𝚛𝚜𝚎𝚌𝚝𝚒𝚘𝚗𝚊𝚕𝚒𝚝𝚢 𝚠𝚘𝚞𝚕𝚍 𝚙𝚎𝚛𝚖𝚒𝚝 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚘𝚕𝚘𝚐𝚢 𝚝𝚘 𝚝𝚊𝚔𝚎 𝚒𝚗𝚝𝚘 𝚌𝚘𝚗𝚜𝚒𝚍𝚎𝚛𝚊𝚝𝚒𝚘𝚗 𝚊𝚕𝚕 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚜𝚘𝚌𝚒𝚊𝚕 𝚒𝚗𝚝𝚛𝚒𝚌𝚊𝚌𝚒𝚎𝚜 𝚘𝚏 𝙲𝚑𝚛𝚒𝚜𝚝𝚒𝚊𝚗 𝚌𝚘𝚖𝚖𝚞𝚗𝚒𝚝𝚒𝚎𝚜 𝚒𝚗 𝚑𝚎𝚛 𝚒𝚗𝚝𝚎𝚛𝚙𝚛𝚎𝚝𝚊𝚝𝚒𝚘𝚗 𝚘𝚏 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝙱𝚒𝚋𝚕𝚎. 𝚃𝚑𝚒𝚜 𝚒𝚜 𝚠𝚑𝚢 𝚏𝚘𝚛 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚖 “𝚒𝚗𝚝𝚎𝚛𝚜𝚎𝚌𝚝𝚒𝚘𝚗𝚊𝚕 𝚝𝚑𝚒𝚗𝚔𝚒𝚗𝚐 𝚖𝚒𝚐𝚑𝚝 𝚎𝚡𝚙𝚊𝚗𝚍 𝚘𝚞𝚛 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚘𝚕𝚘𝚐𝚒𝚎𝚜 𝚊𝚗𝚍 𝚎𝚗𝚑𝚊𝚗𝚌𝚎 𝚘𝚞𝚛 𝚞𝚗𝚍𝚎𝚛𝚜𝚝𝚊𝚗𝚍𝚒𝚗𝚐𝚜 𝚘𝚏 𝙶𝚘𝚍”. (𝚙. 𝟼𝟻)
𝙸𝚗 𝚌𝚑𝚊𝚙𝚝𝚎𝚛 𝟻, 𝙿𝚛𝚊𝚌𝚝𝚒𝚌𝚒𝚗𝚐 𝙸𝚗𝚝𝚎𝚛𝚜𝚎𝚌𝚝𝚒𝚘𝚗𝚊𝚕 𝚃𝚑𝚎𝚘𝚕𝚘𝚐𝚢 (𝚙𝚙. 𝟽𝟿–𝟷0𝟼) 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚊𝚞𝚝𝚑𝚘𝚛𝚜 𝚌𝚊𝚕𝚕 𝚘𝚗 𝙲𝚑𝚛𝚒𝚜𝚝𝚒𝚊𝚗𝚜 𝚝𝚘 𝚋𝚎𝚌𝚘𝚖𝚎 𝚙𝚛𝚘𝚊𝚌𝚝𝚒𝚟𝚎 𝚊𝚗𝚍 𝚖𝚘𝚛𝚎 𝚎𝚗𝚐𝚊𝚐𝚒𝚗𝚐 𝚒𝚗 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚜𝚘𝚌𝚒𝚎𝚝𝚢 𝚋𝚞𝚒𝚕𝚍𝚒𝚗𝚐. 𝚃𝚑𝚎𝚢 𝚍𝚎𝚖𝚊𝚗𝚍 𝚝𝚑𝚊𝚝 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚘𝚕𝚘𝚐𝚢 𝚏𝚊𝚟𝚘𝚞𝚛𝚜 𝚜𝚘𝚌𝚒𝚊𝚕 𝚓𝚞𝚜𝚝𝚒𝚌𝚎 𝚊𝚗𝚍 𝚙𝚞𝚝 𝚒𝚗𝚝𝚘 𝚌𝚘𝚗𝚜𝚒𝚍𝚎𝚛𝚊𝚝𝚒𝚘𝚗 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚜𝚒𝚝𝚞𝚊𝚝𝚒𝚘𝚗 𝚘𝚏 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚘𝚙𝚙𝚛𝚎𝚜𝚜𝚎𝚍 𝚒𝚗 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚒𝚛 𝚏𝚊𝚒𝚝𝚑 𝚎𝚡𝚙𝚎𝚛𝚒𝚎𝚗𝚌𝚎. 𝚃𝚑𝚎𝚢 𝚊𝚛𝚝𝚒𝚌𝚞𝚕𝚊𝚝𝚎 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚜𝚎 𝚠𝚘𝚛𝚍𝚜 “𝚊𝚜 𝚊 𝚕𝚒𝚋𝚎𝚛𝚊𝚝𝚘𝚛𝚢 𝚙𝚛𝚊𝚌𝚝𝚒𝚌𝚎, 𝚒𝚗𝚝𝚎𝚛𝚜𝚎𝚌𝚝𝚒𝚘𝚗𝚊𝚕 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚘𝚕𝚘𝚐𝚢 𝚖𝚎𝚊𝚗𝚜 𝙲𝚑𝚛𝚒𝚜𝚝𝚒𝚊𝚗𝚜 𝚖𝚞𝚜𝚝 𝚛𝚎𝚕𝚒𝚗𝚚𝚞𝚒𝚜𝚑 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚒𝚛 𝚒𝚗𝚍𝚒𝚟𝚒𝚍𝚞𝚊𝚕 𝚙𝚛𝚒𝚟𝚒𝚕𝚎𝚐𝚎 𝚊𝚗𝚍 𝚠𝚘𝚛𝚔 𝚝𝚘𝚠𝚊𝚛𝚍 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚍𝚒𝚜𝚖𝚊𝚗𝚝𝚕𝚒𝚗𝚐 𝚘𝚏 𝚜𝚢𝚜𝚝𝚎𝚖𝚜 𝚘𝚏 𝚘𝚙𝚙𝚛𝚎𝚜𝚜𝚒𝚘𝚗. 𝙲𝚑𝚛𝚒𝚜𝚝𝚒𝚊𝚗𝚜 𝚌𝚊𝚗 𝚗𝚘 𝚕𝚘𝚗𝚐𝚎𝚛 𝚒𝚐𝚗𝚘𝚛𝚎 𝚛𝚊𝚌𝚒𝚜𝚖, 𝚜𝚎𝚡𝚒𝚜𝚖, 𝚑𝚎𝚝𝚎𝚛𝚘𝚜𝚎𝚡𝚒𝚜𝚖, 𝚌𝚕𝚊𝚜𝚜𝚒𝚜𝚖, 𝚊𝚋𝚕𝚎𝚒𝚜𝚖, 𝚊𝚗𝚍 𝚊𝚐𝚎𝚒𝚜𝚖. 𝚆𝚎 𝚗𝚎𝚎𝚍 𝚝𝚘 𝚗𝚊𝚖𝚎 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚜𝚎 𝚒𝚗𝚝𝚎𝚛𝚕𝚘𝚌𝚔𝚒𝚗𝚐 𝚜𝚢𝚜𝚝𝚎𝚖𝚜 𝚘𝚏 𝚘𝚙𝚙𝚛𝚎𝚜𝚜𝚒𝚘𝚗 𝚊𝚜 𝚜𝚒𝚗 𝚊𝚗𝚍 𝚖𝚘𝚟𝚎 𝚝𝚘𝚠𝚊𝚛𝚍 𝚛𝚎𝚒𝚖𝚊𝚐𝚒𝚗𝚒𝚗𝚐 𝚊 𝚌𝚘𝚖𝚖𝚞𝚗𝚒𝚝𝚢 𝚝𝚑𝚊𝚝 𝚌𝚊𝚗 𝚕𝚒𝚟𝚎 𝚘𝚞𝚝 𝚒𝚗𝚝𝚎𝚛𝚜𝚎𝚌𝚝𝚒𝚘𝚗𝚊𝚕 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚘𝚕𝚘𝚐𝚢.”

No comments:

Post a comment